Kids Bike Helmets

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#1

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based on 11594 reviews

9.2

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#2

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based on 9901 reviews

9.4

Color: ‎Blue

Material: ‎Plastic

Manufacturer: ‎Pacific Cycle, inc.

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#3

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based on 9786 reviews

9.4

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#4

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based on 9174 reviews

9.4

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#5

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based on 9173 reviews

9.4

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#6

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based on 8804 reviews

9.4

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#7

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based on 8804 reviews

9.4

Item Weight: ‎0.6 Pounds

Color: ‎All Paws Blue

Material: ‎Plastic

Manufacturer: ‎Pacific Cycle, Inc.

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#8

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based on 7627 reviews

9.6

Item Weight: ‎0.39 Kilograms

Color: ‎Black/Red

Material: ‎Other

Manufacturer: ‎Bell Sports

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#9

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based on 7333 reviews

9.2

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#10

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based on 7195 reviews

9.2

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FAQs: Kids Bike Helmets

How do you choose a helmet for a child?

Place the helmet on top of the child's head and secure it with tape. The helmet should be roughly two fingers wide above the child's brows and should not be too tight. Looking at the child's head from the side, a correctly fitted helmet should extend past his or her nose. This can be verified by having your youngster tap his or her helmet against a solid wall.

What do I look for in a kids bike helmet?

Make certain that the helmet you are using is the proper size for your youngster. The helmet should be worn above the child's ears as well as on his or her forehead. It should not be tipped backwards or forwards at any time. The width of the front of the helmet should be approximately the same as the width of two fingers above the brows.

Because of this, if the child falls, the helmet will not make contact with their head, regardless of the angle at which they hit the ground. It may be necessary to modify the helmet retention system, which is located in the rear, in order to guarantee that the helmet fits properly. The helmet should not dig into the head, but it should be robust enough to keep the head in place without the straps coming undone.

By putting the helmet on the child's head without the chin strap, you may easily determine whether or not the helmet is properly fitted. It's important that the chin straps are snug but not too tight. Also, make sure that the Y-shaped connector is directly below the ear and that it may be accessed from any direction.

To achieve a great fit, you should be able to slide a finger between the buckle and the skin. A finger should be placed between the clip mechanism of the helmet and your child's chin in order to prevent their skin from being mistakenly caught in the helmet.

It will be strange at first for the child if he or she is not used to it. Many children will try to push it back onto their foreheads and back of their heads. It is critical to assist them in adjusting to the sensation and maintaining it in the proper position.

What are the guidelines for a bike helmet?

The helmet should be snugly fitted on all sides. Between the foam and the bike rider's head, there should not be any gaps or openings. Inquire as to how the helmet feels on the heads of your children or teenagers.

Helmets should be snug, but excessively tight helmets might cause headaches in some people. There are bike helmets available for cyclists with long hair.

How do kids' bike helmets work?

Helmets are frequently seen as mere accessories, despite the fact that this may seem clear. This is an erroneous way of approaching the subject of helmets. They have the potential to be life-saving protective devices.

When a person's head comes into contact with a hard surface, such as pavement, a helmet works as a shock absorber. The helmet serves as a protective barrier, preventing the head from coming into direct contact with the pavement. It also helps to lessen the acceleration of the head, which lowers the risk of concussion and bone fractures.

This is particularly crucial for children under the age of ten, who have less developed bones and bodies than older youngsters. For the majority of bike-related accidents, it is possible to save a great deal of discomfort by placing a vital layer between the skull and the ground.

When should my kid wear a bike helmet?

Helmets should be worn at all times, even if they are simply skidding down the driveway. Neither they, nor you, nor professional cyclists are capable of predicting the time of a car accident.

Children, in particular, are oblivious to the numerous circumstances that can influence the outcome of this event. Blown tires, brake problems, concealed cracks and holes, wet leaves, and thoughtless vehicles can all have an impact on even the most organized and well-planned riders.

There is no need for a slide rule for this one. If the wheels are in motion, hard helmets are required.

How effective are bike helmets really?

Helmets are an excellent way to lower the likelihood of injury or death among young bicyclists. A number of investigations have validated this figure, with only a few percentage points differing from the previous study. The data from the various studies are, in fact, extremely comparable.

Every year, between 300,000 and 400,000 youngsters are brought to hospitals due to accidents sustained while riding bicycles. At least 10,000 of these youngsters must be admitted for a period of more than one day. All cyclists suffer from the highest rate of injury, with children aged 5–14 experiencing the highest rate. This age group is the most at risk of being involved in a bicycle accident.

Traumatic brain injuries account for two-thirds (33%) of all fatalities.Broken bones can be repaired. Broken brains, on the other hand, do not. Because internal bleeding or bruising may develop, the injuries may not be immediately apparent. When this happens, it can have catastrophic neurological ramifications as well as negative effects on cognitive performance.

If your child is involved in an accident while not wearing a helmet, he or she may be unable to think clearly. Given these figures, an 85 percent reduction in ER visits is an impressive accomplishment.[pagebreak]

Are kids' bike helmets legally required?

When it comes to bicycle helmets, each state has its own set of regulations. Since 1987, 22 states and the District of Columbia have implemented some sort of helmet regulation, with the District of Columbia being the most recent.

There are more than 200 local rules that control the use of helmets by youngsters under the age of eighteen. All states and localities that fall under this category are listed on the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute's website, which is kept up-to-date and comprehensive.

At the risk of sounding like a grown-up, just because something isn't illegal doesn't imply it's a good idea to engage in it.

Are there certain bike helmet standards I should be looking for?

Despite the fact that there are no federal rules governing helmet use, the United States government takes bicycle safety very seriously and has set helmet standards through the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

A label from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is frequently located on the inside of helmets to ensure that they provide proper protection. Helmets that have been labeled and examined by similar groups will also be considered acceptable by the authorities.

The Snell Memorial Foundation (Snell), the American Section of the International Association for Testing Materials, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) are a few examples of organizations.

How much should I pay for a quality kid's bike helmet?

In this case, it appears that the old adage "you get what you paid for" is still applicable. It is not always the case that bike helmets are a beneficial investment for your bank account. In a series of experiments conducted a few years ago, the BHSI evaluated six different types of helmets. At least half of the helmets cost more than $150.

Half of the helmets were purchased for less than $20. Despite the fact that it was expected that the budget models would fail, the actual outcomes were unexpected. The impact performance of all six models was virtually identical.

As a result of this story, we can conclude that great quality does not always come at a large cost. Helmets that are inexpensive do not always have to be of poor quality. Check to be sure the sticker on your helmet is from one of these groups before you wear it out.

What's the difference between hard-shell and soft-shell bike helmets?

Bike helmets are constructed of expanded polystyrene (EPS), which may be explained without delving into physics. This dense foam absorbs and dissipates the energy resulting from a collision with the skull. Hard-shell helmets have a hard outer shell that is placed on top of the foam to protect the wearer's head. This fiberglass or plastic coating aids in the retention of the EPS after it has been damaged.

This layer protects the EPS from being punctured by sharp items and other potentially harmful objects. Soft-shell helmets contain a thicker foam layer than hard-shell helmets, which makes them more comfortable to wear.

A textile covering or some other type of surface coating can be added to help keep the EPS from breaking apart during a collision. Both versions are safe as long as they are labeled with the CPSC sticker.

It makes no difference which type you like or which one is more comfortable because they both have the same interior. Hard-shell helmets are heavier than soft-shell helmets, despite the fact that they are stronger. This can be turned around to reveal soft-shelled creatures. They are more lightweight and more robust than previous models.

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